Master Mines

We’re digging RPGs

Playstorming Silence….

Yesterday I conducted a playstorming session with my friend Len, and recorded it for an upcoming new podcast called, “Playtesting from the Closet.” Playstorming is a term I stole from Epidiah Ravachol from Rob’s interview on the Independant Insurgency. Basically it’s playing freeform to try to understand the game better. My new site won’t be up for maybe till the end of the month due to Forge Midwest being almost upon me, but you can sneak preview via this link. (Sorry about the gum chewing, it shouldn’t happen again.) It helped me consider what folks might want to do in the game. If you give this a listen I have some questions, if not feel free to… well… do whatever you want to do.

  1. Do I need to have some multi-stage process for having the children effect the scene, or should it be done in a roll?
  2. Am I making sense about colors?
  3. Introducing the scenes doesn’t feel like a strong enough compulsion, any ideas on what I can do to fix it?
  4. Random thoughts?
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April 5, 2008 - Posted by | Games in Development, Silence Keeps Me A Victim

4 Comments »

  1. Clyde, I’m trying to get enough time this weekend to listen to your recording. I’ll have a real reply soon.

    Comment by orklord | April 6, 2008 | Reply

  2. No worries, dude. That sound file isn’t going anywhere.

    Comment by iamclyde | April 6, 2008 | Reply

  3. Comments made as I’m listening.

    1. Would you rather there be a die roll or a multi-stage process? I think your answer to this is more important than mine.

    2. I got that you want colors of chips mean different things, like activities or something. You don’t want to ascribe values to each color, you want this to be defined by players. With no direction for colors, I don’t find it compelling. If each color can mean whatever you want, why have different colors at all? Perhaps each color is tied to a different basic element or action? Len’s suggestion that each color modifies the scene somehow is good.

    3. The game, especially given the source material, has a dream-ike quality. The scenes were very flat in introduction, which may be a function of your desire to give an open interpretation for the players. Also, none of them were tied to the PC. In fact, we don’t know anything about the PC, so how could anyone make it compelling? Len makes a comment about this.

    4.
    * The thing I kept hearing you talk about was what you wanted to teach people. I didn’t hear you talking about how you want people to play as much as you want to teach them.
    * Len’s idea about the phrases the mask can say is very interesting and plays with inflection and the use of language.
    * You don’t want to have players explain during chargen why the PCs lost their voice. What if the mask is a representation of each PCs monster? The player describes the mask and in turn, they define the monster and make indirect statements about why their PC lost their voice.

    Comment by orklord | April 15, 2008 | Reply

  4. Thanks for taking the time to listen.

    1. I’m thinking it needs to be a multi-stage process. Otherwise it will be too easy.

    2. I’m still not sure what they are, but I’ll discover it in time I’m sure.

    3. The scene being flat is what I was afraid of. Having you confirm my inner suspicion has given me an idea to improve it. I need to position the players in the scene, and I need to talk to them in character, and push them. Hopefully that should help.

    4. Yes, I know the motivation for the game, but not how to go about it completely yet.
    *Len’s idea is definitely intriguing.
    *I don’t want to have character differentiation of player characters at the beginning. I know it’s easier to engage people by letting them personalize a character at the start, but I don’t want that. I can’t explain completely why but I think I’m beginning to figure it out.

    Comment by iamclyde | April 16, 2008 | Reply


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